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Eerie, Indiana
cast: Omri Katz and Justin Shenkarow

creators: Jose Rivera and Karl Schaefer

150 minutes (PG) 1991-2
Fabulous DVD Region 2 retail

RATING: 7/10
reviewed by J.C. Hartley
I remember catching this in the 1990s on BBC2 in the early evening kid-spot and formed the opinion that there was some sort of cohesion and continuity to the plots, on the evidence of this single disc that came later, or was the product of my imagination. The only episode I recall involved a machine swapping minds into different bodies (that old chestnut) and the scene that springs to mind (sorry) saw one of the teenage male heroes having his mind switched into the body of an attractive villainess, whereupon he immediately gave his/her breasts a squeeze (or did I dream this?).

The plot sees the Teller family escape from New Jersey to the titular small town in middle America; we're in David Lynch country in the title sequence, with synchronised motor mowers, cloned basketball teams, Bigfoot, Elvis and a crow that drops an eyeball to shred the mail in the Teller's box.

Marshall Teller (Omri Katz) decides to keep a log of weird happenings and with his geek neighbour Simon (Justin Shenkarow) has bizarre encounters in each episode. It has to be said that the storylines are a mixed bag and once the macguffin has been established some of the episodes just go through the motions. In Forever Ware a party-planner is revealed to have kept her and her twin boys 'fresh' in plastic food containers for 30 years, in The Retainer an orthodontic brace picks up dog-thought, in The Losers, Marshall discovers a vast storehouse under Indiana for all the little things you just put down a moment ago.

One postmodern feature that is prevalent now but in its infancy then is the knowing nod and wink to the potential adult audience, so when the Teller's teenage daughter Syndi answers the telephone and begins giggling and simpering down the receiver her parents exchange knowing glances, only for Syndi to hand the telephone to her dad announcing "It's your boss"; when Mr Teller's car breaks down on Halloween, Mrs Teller goes to rescue him but they end up reminiscing about making out in their car until attacked by marauding trick or treaters, on returning home Mr Teller announces "Your mother tried to jump start me but we got interrupted."

An alright series that hasn't dated too badly but relatively unsophisticated to an audience brought up on the horrors of EastEnders and Big Brother.
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